Chaharshanbe Suri

Chaharshanbe Suri

The Chaharshanbe Suri (Chahârshanbe Sûrî) is one of the feasts equally dear to the Iranian population, which is celebrated the night before the last Wednesday of the year and recalls the ancient ceremonies of the Mazda fire cult.
When evening falls, bonfires are lit and everyone, especially the young, stand out jumping over the flames, singing: "Zardie man azto, Sorkhie to az man" ("My yellow to you, your red to me "), because the fire absorbs the negative elements present in the person, the" yellow "speaks of sickness and weakness giving it in return its energy and health, the" red ". The same evening, children and young people go from house to house, keeping the face and body with sheets veiled so as not to be recognized and striking the bottom of metal bowls with spoons: they stop in front of every door until the one who lives in the house, opens, to give them sweets, fruit dry or other small gifts, jokingly trying to drop the sheets to find out who the "troublemakers" are.

There are those who remember, in the same hours, to observe the Falgush, that is the custom of remaining hidden while waiting for two people to talk to each other: the words pronounced by two passersby and inexpensive understandings, detached from their context, are then interpreted to draw auspices.
There are many other traditions related to the Chahârshanbe Sûrî; one of them wants that on this night the spirits of the dead can go back to visit their living descendants, other traditions foresee the breaking of some terracotta amphorae, in an auspice of good luck (Kûzeh Shekastân), and the Gereh-goshâ ' î: the act of knotting a corner of a handkerchief and then asking someone to untie it, another auspicious symbolic act.

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